Thursday, 30 April 2009

Bluebells

Someone was blogging about these the other day - oh yes, the brother. Well, I reckon I've got one in my garden, thrusting up through the sage bush. Look:



Is that a bluebell, or what?

They're protected, aren't they? So does that mean I'm not allowed to dig or weed my garden any more, the government will have to come and do it for me?

No, thought not.

3 comments :

  1. You'll be getting a fine from the Berkshire Department for anything that begins with the letter "B".
    People have written poems about these flowers and they all were fined. Tread carefully.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cowslips are protected as well, I believe, so what about the letter "C".

    I have dug up and carted my bluebells around Norfolk with me when I've moved house so I am probably breaking the rules.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Question is, is it a Spanish bluebell or an English bluebell?

    The English Bluebell is usually found in woods. It is unusual to find it on open ground. When the flowers are fully formed, the stalk of English Bluebells curves downwards to give its characteristic look. One why to help identify an English Bluebell is to see if all the flowers are in the same side of the stalk. As all the flowers on an English Bluebell are on the same side of the stalk, the effect of gravity pulls the stalk over into a beautiful curve.

    The Spanish Bluebell is usually found on open ground. It is unusual to find it in woods. When the flowers are fully formed, the stalk of Spanish Bluebells is straight. One why to help identify an Spanish Bluebell is to see if the flowers are all around the stalk. As all the flowers on a Spanish Bluebell are on the same side of the stalk and the stalk is thicker than the English Bluebell, the effect of gravity does not operate in the same way on the Spanish Bluebell so that it keeps its characteristic straight stalk.

    So there.

    bluebells4u

    ReplyDelete